Online security

Best practices for information security.




Security

These are some basic steps you can take in order to not fall victim to cybercrime.


Keep your programs and OS updated

Most cyberattacks depend on exploiting known errors and vulnerabilities in your operating system, or in commonly used programs like your browser, Flash, or Java. By regularly installing updates from the manufacturer, you minimize the risk of being infected. In most cases, you have the option to turn on automatic updates – which we highly recommend. Many also use free tools FileHippo App Manager or Ninite. These programs keep an eye on all the programs you have installed on your computer, and continuously check for available updates to your programs.


Use built-in security features

You should make sure built-in security features in your operating system, such as access control, encryption, malware protection and firewall, are turned on and configured to suit your needs. These invaluable defence resources are usually free of charge and ready to use. We recommend taking fifteen minutes to learn which functions are available in your operating system. You can read more about the built-in security features of Windows, and of MacOS.


Take advantage of antivirus software and other security tools

Most antivirus programs today include a number of features that not only search for malicious code, but also include a firewall, web scanner, e-mail filters and much more. Of course, here, too, it is important to keep your programs and definition files updated at all times in order to stay protected against the latest threats. However, keep in mind that even the best anti-virus software will only prevent around half of the threats – YOU will always be the first line of defence!


Treat e-mails with care

Remember that you cannot always trust that the sender of an e-mail is who they claim to be. The biggest threat to your computer by far is fraudulent e-mails ("phishing" emails) that try to trick you into clicking links to scam sites or opening an attachment that contains malicious code. Even though many such scams are easy to identify as such, cyber criminals are getting increasingly clever, and phishing emails can often be very convincing and professional looking. Esko will never ask you to provide sensitive information via e-mail, including personal information or passwords. If you receive an e-mail that asks for this information, please report it immediately to security@esko.com.


Protect your passwords/passphrases

Remember that all passwords/passphrases are personal and should never be shared with others. A compromised password/passphrase can quickly fall into the wrong hands. Also, use multiple words combined or a sentence to make your easy to remember passphrase of at least 12 characters. Remember that blank spaces are allowed in your passphrase. You should also use different passphrases for all the main web services you use – the first thing a cybercriminal will do is to test whether your username or passphrase can be used to access other common services such as social media, webmail, or your work data. Change passphrases regularly, use long passphrases and enable two-factor authentication whenever possible. Following these simple steps will considerably improve your online security!


Back up your content regularly

Whether it's a fire, a burglary or a virus that has encrypted all your data: when disaster strikes, it's too late to lament the fact that you did not back up your data – you will have lost all your documents, e-mails and holiday photos. Maintain a regular routine for backing up your data. Most external hard drives are capable of storing your most important files, and usually include software that will make your backup routine easy as pie. However, make sure you keep your backup device in a different location from your computer!




Identity Theft

Theft of personal data and assuming someone else's identity for personal gain is a form for cybercrime that has increased significantly in recent years. Safeguard your personal information and be careful about who you disclose it to – whether online, on the phone or in person. If you should fall victim to identity theft, the consequences can be severe, and may take a very long time to remedy. For example, cybercriminals can attempt to apply for loans or credit cards, buy goods and services or commit other criminal activities in your name. Fraudulent e-mails and fake websites are examples of digital threats where you are tricked into providing the information the cybercriminals are after. However, you should also remember that the physical mail you receive in your mailbox and documents you throw in the garbage can contain personal information – making it a potential goldmine for cybercriminals. The online resource https://cybersecuritymonth.eu/, which is run by the European Security Agency ENISA, contains several tips and best practices for how to avoid becoming the victim of identity theft, as well as what you can do if your information has been compromised.




Phishing — a type of online scam

"Phishing" is a type of online fraud where cybercriminals are mining for sensitive information that can be used for fraudulent purposes. The cybercriminals send you an e-mail or instant message that looks like it is from Esko or other trusted sources. You will be asked to click a link that redirects you to the cybercriminal's website. The webpage may look just like one of our Esko webpages, but it is actually a dummy page. The purpose is to trick you into providing sensitive information such as your national ID number, user name, or credit card information. Always be careful when you are asked to click links in e-mails or other instant messaging services. Verify that the website is a genuine webpage by looking at the URL field in your browser:




Contact us

If you detect any suspicious activity around your online Esko ID, if something unexpected happens when attempting to log on to www.esko.com, or if you suspect that sensitive information has been compromised, do not hesitate to contact us at security@esko.com

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